Day 2 – Petrichor

TWT30DaysWild_countdown_02Torrential rain, memory loss and toddler tantrums. Not an auspicious start to the second day of our #30DaysWild, but as the saying goes, bad things come in threes. Once we had them behind us the day could only get better. With the mini farmers departing to spend time with relatives, the rain clouds rolling off into the distance and the garden beckoning I decided on a simple stroll around our ‘patch’; the wild, uncouth area that lies to the side of the farmhouse.

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Once upon a time it was a more formal affair, with carefully tended rose beds and well pruned shrubs. Nowadays, through years of benign neglect, it is a tangle of weeds. Until last June, I found it an eyesore, and started trying to tame it back into some semblance of a tidy space. But with the arrival of 30 days wild, I started to see it as something different. No longer was it a messy disgraceful space, but home to all manner of ‘mini beasts’ . It provides food for birds, bats and foxes. So this year I left it wild and let nature run its course. Today, with the scent of petrichor hanging over the patch I set off to see what creatures I could find.

I came across this Scorpion fly perched atop a bramble leaf . These curious insects earn their name from their long scorpion-like tail. They feed on dead insects, including those trapped in spiders webs. Like some spiders, the male needs to placate the female during mating with a ‘nuptial gift’, so she isn’t tempted to kill him.

Next up, some day flying moths. This male long horned, or Fairy, moth was sunning himself on a nettle leaf. This species has amazingly, bordering on ridiculously,  long ‘filiform’ antenna. In this chaps case they were at least 4 times the length of his body, with an apparent life force all of their own.

On a neighbouring clump of nettles I spotted a micro moth, which turned out to be the rather aptly named ‘Nettle Tap’ moth.img_6845

With all my crashing around in the path (even though I was desperately attempting to avoid being ungainly) I disturbed a Silver-ground carpet moth. This moth is nocturnal but easily disturbed from its daytime resting spots. The caterpillars of this species feed on Cleavers and Primroses, which are plentiful in the ‘patch’.
Not to be outdone, several species of butterfly were fluttering around the patch. Only this speckled wood alighted long enough for me to snap a quick photo.

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There were many, many more creatures flitting and skulking about the patch. I’m glad I bothered to let it stay wild. If we had mown the nettles, chopped all the brambles and pulled up the other assorted ‘weeds’ this little patch would be a whole lot poorer for it.

 

 

 

 

 

30 Days Wild 2017- Prologue

One day until our 30 Days Wild experience begins. Well, technically speaking there are only approximately 3 hours left of May, but I’m not planning on kicking off this years challenge with a dawn chorus walk or a spot of midnight moth trapping.

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It seems bizarre that an entire year has passed and we are planning on taking part again. Last year was my first year being involved in this month long challenge. It was a fantastic experience, spending a whole month immersing ourselves in nature. Looking back I’m not sure quite how I managed to squeeze in so many acts of wildness with the a 2 year old and a 7 month old in tow. We created a wormery to watched red kites soar above us, collected finds for a nature table, visited a bug farm, took part in a bioblitz, attempted to lure moths and even managed a beach clean with the baby ‘helping out’. The whole month passed by in a blur, and I can honestly say the experience left a lasting imprint on our lives. It helped me start along my road of recovery, away from depression ( a road with many potholes, dead ends and detours), which was one of my hopes in the run up to last years challenge. It reconnected me with writing, and my passion for the great outdoors which had somehow got lost under the everyday mantle of ‘being a mum’. As the challenge is self driven, I could dip in and out as much as I wanted. On ‘bad days’, when the ‘dementors’ were knocking on the door, we managed small nature based goals. On ‘good days’ anything goes. This year, the cloud of depression has lifted, only to be replaced by Partial Seizures. My newly acquired condition means I get tired easily and (worse still) can’t drive. I have done some ‘pre planning’, jotting down some ideas of things I would like to attempt, and I hope we can at least tick off a few.

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Participating in 30 Days wild also means you get to meet a lovely group of like minded individuals through the online 30 days wild community- on twitter and facebook. Seeing what others get up to daily, learning from each other, helping identify nature finds and sharing ideas on what to do next all adds to the fun.

I can’t wait to see what this years challenge brings. Reflecting on  the legacy left by last years experience was wonderful . It allowed me to see how much of a personal journey I had made over the month. If you feel like joining in this year there is still time to sign up here, and you can even nab yourself a free pack too (it has stickers, who doesn’t like free stickers?!).